Center for Mathematical Sciences Lectures

 

 

 

 

invites you to a

SPECIAL LECTURE SERIES

to be presented by

ABSTRACTS

 Professor  Danny Calegari

 University of Chicago

  January 14, 16, 17, 2013 at 15:30, Technion, Haifa, Israel

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Danny Calegari is currently a Professor of Pure Mathematics at Cambridge University in England. His undergraduate studies were done at the University of Melbourne and were completed with honors in 1994. He received his PhD from UC Berkeley in 2000 under the supervision of Andrew Casson. He continued as a Benjamin Price assistant professor at Harvard, and in 2002 he joined the department of mathematics in Caltec  where he became a Full Professor in 2006. A year later he was appointed the Richard Merkin Distinguished Professor of Mathematics at California Institute of Technology.

 

Professor Danny Calegari's main areas of research are the connection between the geometry of hyberbolic 3-manifolds, dynamics on them and topology, where he wrote many papers on laminations and foliations in 3-manifolds. He has also worked in the area of geometric group theory, studying stable commutator length and various ergodic questions regarding 3-manifolds.

 

Professor Danny Calegari was the Sloan Research Fellow between 2003 and 2005 and a Clay Lecturer during 2009-10. In 2009 he, together with Dave Gabai, received the prestigious Clay Research Award for proving (in 2004) the Marden Conjecture (independently proved by Ian Agol). The conjecture states that every complete hyperbolic 3-manifold with finitely generated fundamental group is topologically tame or  in other words, homeomorphic to the interior of a compact 3-manifold.

 

In 2012 he delivered the Namboodiri Lecture at the University of Chicago and was awarded the Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award for the years 2011 - 2016.

 

Danny Calegari is the editor of several journal among them Geometry and Topology and Journal of Topology and Analysis. He has published over 50 papers and two books and has had six students.